Bankers Threads
Click to return to BOL home page

Learn more about

MEMBERS















Have a Question?
Looking for a
Product or
Service?

Our Vendor
Advisory Board








Topic Options
#1112698 - 01/16/09 02:31 PM State law regarding "Right to Cure" letters
illiniyak Offline
100 Club

Registered: 01/25/08
Posts: 227
Is there a state regulation that outlines Right to Cure letters and when to send them out? We currently use 90 days past due; then the letter gives them 30 days before we can collect the collateral. Any suggestions are appreciated.

Top
#1113283 - 01/19/09 01:43 PM Re: State law regarding "Right to Cure" letters [Re: illiniyak]
rlcarey Offline
10K Club

Registered: 07/16/01
Posts: 48565
Loc: Galveston, TX
(815 ILCS 137/105)
Sec. 105. Right to cure.
(a) Before an action is filed to foreclose or collect money due pursuant to a high risk home loan or before other action is taken to seize or transfer ownership of property subject to a high risk home loan, the lender or lender's assignee of the loan shall deliver to the borrower a notice of the right to cure the default, informing the borrower of all of the following:
(1) The nature of the default.
(2) The borrower's right to cure the default by
paying the sum of money required, provided that a lender or assignee shall accept any partial payment made or tendered in response to the notice. If the amount necessary to cure the default will change within 30 days of the notice due to the application of a daily interest rate or the addition of late fees, as allowed by the Act, the notice shall give sufficient information to enable the borrower to calculate the amount at any point within the 30‑day period.

(3) The date by which the borrower may cure the
default to avoid a court action, acceleration and initiation of foreclosure, or other action to seize the property, which date shall not be less than 30 days after the date the notice is delivered, and the name, address, and telephone number of a person to whom the payment or tender shall be made.

(4) That if the borrower does not cure the default
by the date specified, the lender or assignee may file an action for money due or take steps to terminate the borrower's ownership in the property by requiring payment in full of the high risk home loan and commencing a foreclosure proceeding or other action to seize the property.

(5) The name, address, and telephone number of a
person whom the borrower may contact if the borrower disagrees with the assertion that a default has occurred or the correctness of the calculation of the amount required to cure the default.

(b) If a lender or assignee asserts that grounds for acceleration exist and requires the payment in full of all sums secured by the high risk home loan, the borrower or anyone authorized to act on the borrower's behalf may, at any time before the title is transferred by means of foreclosure, by judicial proceeding and sale, or other means, cure the default, and reinstate the high risk home loan. Cure of the default shall reinstate the borrower to the same position as if the default had not occurred and shall nullify, as of the date of the cure, an acceleration of any obligation under the high risk home loan arising from the default.
(c) To cure a default under this Section, a borrower shall not be required to pay any charge, fee, or penalty attributable to the exercise of the right to cure a default, other than the fees specifically allowed by this subsection. The borrower shall not be liable for any attorney fees relating to the default that are incurred by the lender or assignee prior to or during the 30‑day period set forth in subsection (a) of this Section, nor for any such fees in excess of $100 that are incurred by the lender or assignee after the expiration of the 30‑day period but before the lender or assignee files a foreclosure or other judicial action or takes other action to seize or transfer ownership of the real estate. After the lender or assignee files a foreclosure or other judicial action or takes other action to seize or transfer ownership of the real estate, the borrower shall only be liable for attorney fees that are reasonable and actually incurred by the lender or assignee, based on a reasonable hourly rate and a reasonable number of hours.
(d) If a default is cured prior to the initiation of any action to foreclose or to seize the residence, the lender or assignee shall not institute a proceeding or other action for that default. If a default is cured after the initiation of any action, the lender or assignee shall take such steps as are necessary to terminate the action.
(e) A lender or a lender's assignee of a high risk home loan that has the legal right to foreclose shall use the judicial foreclosure procedures provided by law. In such a proceeding, the borrower may assert the nonexistence of a default and any other claim or defense to acceleration and foreclosure, including any claim or defense based on a violation of the Act, though no such claim or defense shall be deemed a compulsory counterclaim.
(Source: P.A. 93‑561, eff. 1‑1‑04.)
_________________________
The opinions expressed are my own, take them or leave them.

Top
#1114179 - 01/21/09 11:41 AM Re: State law regarding "Right to Cure" letters [Re: rlcarey]
illiniyak Offline
100 Club

Registered: 01/25/08
Posts: 227
Thank you for the Reg

Top
#1189909 - 05/26/09 11:51 AM Re: State law regarding "Right to Cure" letters [Re: illiniyak]
Gertie Offline
Member

Registered: 06/03/05
Posts: 84
There is a new Illinois State law than went into effect April 6th, 2009. See IL public Act 95-1047, which amends the Illinois Mortgage Foreclosure Law that effectively forbears residential foreclosure actions for up to 90 days.

Top