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Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection —
12 CFR Chapter X

Part 1026 — Truth in Lending (Regulation Z)

Subpart E—Special Rules for Certain Home Mortgage Transactions

§ 1026.41   Periodic statements for residential mortgage loans.

Added effective January 10, 2014.

CONTENTS OF THIS SECTION (click to navigate)
(a)(1) In general: scope
(a)(2) In general: Periodic statements
(b) Timing of the periodic statement
(c) Form of the periodic statement
(d) Content and layout of the periodic statement
(e)(1) Exemptions: Reverse mortgages
(e)(2) Exemptions: Timeshare plans
(e)(3) Exemptions: coupon books
(e)(4) Exemptions: Small servicers
(e)(5) Exemptions: Consumers in bankruptcy

For the Official Bureau Interpretations applicable to this section, click HERE.

(a) In general. (1) Scope. This section applies to a closed-end consumer credit transaction secured by a dwelling, unless an exemption in paragraph (e) of this section applies. A closed-end consumer credit transaction secured by a dwelling is referred to as a mortgage loan for purposes of this section.

(2) Periodic statements. A servicer of a transaction subject to this section shall provide the consumer, for each billing cycle, a periodic statement meeting the requirements of paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section. If a mortgage loan has a billing cycle shorter than a period of 31 days (for example, a bi-weekly billing cycle), a periodic statement covering an entire month may be used. For the purposes of this section, servicer includes the creditor, assignee, or servicer, as applicable. A creditor or assignee that does not currently own the mortgage loan or the mortgage servicing rights is not subject to the § 1026.41 requirement to provide a periodic statement.

(b) Timing of the periodic statement. The periodic statement must be delivered or placed in the mail within a reasonably prompt time after the payment due date or the end of any courtesy period provided for the previous billing cycle.

(c) Form of the periodic statement. The servicer must make the disclosures required by this section clearly and conspicuously in writing, or electronically if the consumer agrees, and in a form that the consumer may keep. Sample forms for periodic statements are provided in appendix H-30. Proper use of these forms complies with the requirements of this paragraph (c) and the layout requirements in paragraph (d) of this section.

(d) Content and layout of the periodic statement. The periodic statement required by this section shall include:

(1) Amount due. Grouped together in close proximity to each other and located at the top of the first page of the statement:

(i) The payment due date;

(ii) The amount of any late payment fee, and the date on which that fee will be imposed if payment has not been received; and

(iii) The amount due, shown more prominently than other disclosures on the page and, if the transaction has multiple payment options, the amount due under each of the payment options.

(2) Explanation of amount due. The following items, grouped together in close proximity to each other and located on the first page of the statement:

(i) The monthly payment amount, including a breakdown showing how much, if any, will be applied to principal, interest, and escrow and, if a mortgage loan has multiple payment options, a breakdown of each of the payment options along with information on whether the principal balance will increase, decrease, or stay the same for each option listed;

(ii) The total sum of any fees or charges imposed since the last statement; and

(iii) Any payment amount past due.

(3) Past Payment Breakdown. The following items, grouped together in close proximity to each other and located on the first page of the statement:

(i) The total of all payments received since the last statement, including a breakdown showing the amount, if any, that was applied to principal, interest, escrow, fees and charges, and the amount, if any, sent to any suspense or unapplied funds account; and

(ii) The total of all payments received since the beginning of the current calendar year, including a breakdown of that total showing the amount, if any, that was applied to principal, interest, escrow, fees and charges, and the amount, if any, currently held in any suspense or unapplied funds account.

(4) Transaction activity. A list of all the transaction activity that occurred since the last statement. For purposes of this paragraph (d)(4), transaction activity means any activity that causes a credit or debit to the amount currently due. This list must include the date of the transaction, a brief description of the transaction, and the amount of the transaction for each activity on the list.

(5) Partial payment information. If a statement reflects a partial payment that was placed in a suspense or unapplied funds account, information explaining what must be done for the funds to be applied. The information must be on the front page of the statement or, alternatively, may be included on a separate page enclosed with the periodic statement or in a separate letter.

(6) Contact information. A toll-free telephone number and, if applicable, an electronic mailing address that may be used by the consumer to obtain information about the consumer's account, located on the front page of the statement.

(7) Account information. The following information:

(i) The amount of the outstanding principal balance;

(ii) The current interest rate in effect for the mortgage loan;

(iii) The date after which the interest rate may next change;

(iv) The existence of any prepayment penalty, as defined in § 1026.32(b)(6)(i), that may be charged;

(v) The website to access either the Bureau list or the HUD list of homeownership counselors and counseling organizations and the HUD toll-free telephone number to access contact information for homeownership counselors or counseling organizations; and

(8) Delinquency information. If the consumer is more than 45 days delinquent, the following items, grouped together in close proximity to each other and located on the first page of the statement or, alternatively, on a separate page enclosed with the periodic statement or in a separate letter:

(i) The date on which the consumer became delinquent;

(ii) A notification of possible risks, such as foreclosure, and expenses, that may be incurred if the delinquency is not cured;

(iii) An account history showing, for the previous six months or the period since the last time the account was current, whichever is shorter, the amount remaining past due from each billing cycle or, if any such payment was fully paid, the date on which it was credited as fully paid;

(iv) A notice indicating any loss mitigation program to which the consumer has agreed, if applicable;

(v) A notice of whether the servicer has made the first notice or filing required by applicable law for any judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process, if applicable;

(vi) The total payment amount needed to bring the account current; and

(vii) A reference to the homeownership counselor information disclosed pursuant to paragraph (d)(7)(v) of this section.

(e) Exemptions. (1) Reverse mortgages. Reverse mortgage transactions, as defined by § 1026.33(a), are exempt from the requirements of this section.

(2) Timeshare plans. Transactions secured by consumers' interests in timeshare plans, as defined by 11 U.S.C. 101(53D), are exempt from the requirements of this section.

(3) Coupon books. The requirements of paragraph (a) do not apply to fixed-rate loans if the servicer:

(i) Provides the consumer with a coupon book that includes on each coupon the information listed in paragraph (d)(1) of this section;

(ii) Provides the consumer with a coupon book that includes anywhere in the coupon book:

(A) The account information listed in paragraph (d)(7) of this section;

(B) The contact information for the servicer, listed in paragraph (d)(6) of this section; and

(C) Information on how the consumer can obtain the information listed in paragraph (e)(3)(iii) of this section;

(iii) Makes available upon request to the consumer by telephone, in writing, in person, or electronically, if the consumer consents, the information listed in paragraph (d)(2) through (5) of this section; and

(iv) Provides the consumer the information listed in paragraph (d)(8) of this section in writing, for any billing cycle during which the consumer is more than 45 days delinquent.

(4) Small servicers. (i) Exemption. A creditor, assignee, or servicer is exempt from the requirements of this section for mortgage loans serviced by a small servicer.

(ii) Small servicer defined. A small servicer is a servicer that either:

(A) Services, together with any affiliates, 5,000 or fewer mortgage loans, for all of which the servicer (or an affiliate) is the creditor or assignee; or

(B) Is a Housing Finance Agency, as defined in 24 CFR 266.5; or

(C) Is a nonprofit entity that services 5,000 or fewer mortgage loans, including any mortgage loans serviced on behalf of associated nonprofit entities, for all of which the servicer or an associated nonprofit entity is the creditor. For purposes of this paragraph (e)(4)(ii)(C), the following definitions apply:

(1) The term "nonprofit entity" means an entity having a tax exemption ruling or determination letter from the Internal Revenue Service under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. 501(c)(3); 26 CFR 1.501(c)(3)-1), and;

(2) The term "associated nonprofit entities" means nonprofit entities that by agreement operate using a common name, trademark, or servicemark to further and support a common charitable mission or purpose.

(iii) Small servicer determination. In determining whether a servicer satisfies paragraph (e)(4)(ii)(A) of this section, the servicer is evaluated based on the mortgage loans serviced by the servicer and any affiliates as of January 1 and for the remainder of the calendar year. In determining whether a servicer satisfies paragraph (e)(4)(ii)(C) of this section, the servicer is evaluated based on the mortgage loans serviced by the servicer as of January 1 and for the remainder of the calendar year. A servicer that ceases to qualify as a small servicer will have six months from the time it ceases to qualify or until the next January 1, whichever is later, to comply with any requirements from which the servicer is no longer exempt as a small servicer. The following mortgage loans are not considered in determining whether a servicer qualifies as a small servicer:

(A) Mortgage loans voluntarily serviced by the servicer for a creditor or assignee that is not an affiliate of the servicer and for which the servicer does not receive any compensation or fees.

(B) Reverse mortgage transactions.

(C) Mortgage loans secured by consumers' interests in timeshare plans.

(5) Consumers in bankruptcy. A servicer is exempt from the requirements of this section for a mortgage loan while the consumer is a debtor in bankruptcy under Title 11 of the United States Code.

Official Interpretations of this section.

Section 1026.41—Periodic Statements for Residential Mortgage Loans

41(a) In general.

1. Recipient of periodic statement. When two consumers are joint obligors with primary liability on a closed-end consumer credit transaction secured by a dwelling, subject to § 1026.41, the periodic statement may be sent to either one of them. For example, if a husband and wife jointly own a home, the servicer need not send statements to both the husband and the wife; a single statement may be sent.

2. Billing cycles shorter than a 31-day period. If a loan has a billing cycle shorter than a period of 31 days (for example, a bi-weekly billing cycle), a periodic statement covering an entire month may be used. Such statement would separately list the upcoming payment due dates and amounts due, as required by § 1026.20(d)(1), and list all transaction activity that occurred during the related time period, as required by paragraph (d)(4). Such statement may aggregate the information for the explanation of amount due, as required by paragraph (d)(2), and past payment breakdown, as required by paragraph (d)(3).

3. One statement per billing cycle. The periodic statement requirement in § 1026.41 applies to the "creditor, assignee, or servicer as applicable." The creditor, assignee, and servicer are all subject to this requirement (but see comment 41(a)-4), but only one statement must be sent to the consumer each billing cycle. When two or more parties are subject to this requirement, they may decide among themselves which of them will send the statement.

4. Opting out. A consumer may not opt out of receiving periodic statements altogether. However, consumers who have demonstrated the ability to access statements online may opt out of receiving notifications that statements are available. Such an ability may be demonstrated, for example, by the consumer receiving notification that the statements is available, going to the website where the information is available, viewing the information about their account and selecting a link or option there to indicate they no longer would like to receive notifications when new statements are available.

41(b) Timing of the periodic statement.

1. Reasonably prompt time. Section 1026.41(b) requires that the periodic statement be delivered or placed in the mail no later than a reasonably prompt time after the payment due date or the end of any courtesy period. Delivering, emailing or placing the periodic statement in the mail within four days of close of the courtesy period of the previous billing cycle generally would be considered reasonably prompt.

2. Courtesy period. The meaning of "courtesy period" is explained in comment 7(b)(11)-1.

41(c) Form of the periodic statement.

1. Clear and conspicuous standard. The "clear and conspicuous" standard generally requires that disclosures be in a reasonably understandable form. Except where otherwise provided, the standard does not prohibit adding to the required disclosures, as long as the additional information does not overwhelm or obscure the required disclosures. For example, while certain information about the escrow account (such as the account balance) is not required on the periodic statement, this information may be included.

2. Additional information; disclosures required by other laws. Nothing in § 1026.41 prohibits a servicer from including additional information or combining disclosures required by other laws with the disclosures required by this subpart, unless such prohibition is expressly set forth in this subpart, or other applicable law.

3. Electronic distribution. The periodic statement may be provided electronically if the consumer agrees. The consumer must give affirmative consent to receive statements electronically. If statements are provided electronically, the creditor, assignee, or servicer may send a notification that a consumer's statement is available, with a link to where the statement can be accessed, in place of the statement itself.

4. Presumed consent. Any consumer who is currently receiving disclosures for any account (for example, a mortgage or checking account) electronically from their servicer shall be deemed to have consented to receiving e-statements in place of paper statements.

41(d) Content and layout of the periodic statement.

1. Close proximity. Paragraph (d) requires several disclosures to be provided in close proximity to one another. To meet this requirement, the items to be provided in close proximity must be grouped together, and set off from the other groupings of items. This could be accomplished in a variety of ways, for example, by presenting the information in boxes, or by arranging the items on the document and including spacing between the groupings. Items in close proximity may not have any intervening text between them.

2. Not applicable. If an item required by paragraph (d) or (e) of this section is not applicable to the loan, it may be omitted from the periodic statement or coupon book. For example, if there is no prepayment penalty associated with a loan, the prepayment penalty disclosures need not be provided on the periodic statement.

3. Terminology. A servicer may use terminology other than that found on the sample periodic statement in appendix H-30, so long as the new terminology is commonly understood. For example, servicers may take into consideration regional differences in terminology and refer to the account for the collection of taxes and insurance, referred to in § 1026.41(d) as the "escrow account," as an "impound account."

41(d)(3) Past payment breakdown.

1. Partial payments. The disclosure of any partial payments received since the previous statement that were sent to a suspense or unapplied funds account as required by § 1026.41(d)(3)(i) should reflect any funds that were received in the time period covered by the current statement and that were placed in such account. The disclosure of any portion of payments since the beginning of the calendar year that was sent to a partial payment or suspense account as required by § 1026.41(d)(3)(ii) should reflect all funds that are currently held in a suspense or unapplied funds account. For example:

i. Suppose a payment of $1,000 is due, but the consumer sends in only $600 on January 1, which is held in a suspense account. Further assume there are no fees charged on this account. Assuming there are no other funds in the suspense account, the January statement should reflect: Unapplied funds since last statement - $600. Unapplied funds YTD - $600.

ii. Assume the same facts as in the preceding paragraph, except that during February the consumer sends in $300 and this too is held in the suspense account. The statement should reflect: Unapplied funds since last statement - $300. Unapplied funds YTD - $900.

iii. Assume the same facts as in the preceding paragraph, except that during March the consumer sends in $400. Of this payment, $100 completes a full periodic payment when added to the $900 in funds already held in the suspense account. This $1,000 is applied to the January payment, and the remaining $300 remains in the suspense account. The statement should reflect: Unapplied funds since last statement - $300. Unapplied Funds YTD - $300.

41(d)(4) Transaction Activity.

1. Meaning. Transaction activity includes any transaction that credits or debits the amount currently due. This is the same amount that is required to be disclosure under § 1026.41(d)(1)(iii). Examples of such transactions include, without limitation:

i. Payments received and applied;

ii. Payments received and held in a suspense account;

iii. The imposition of any fees (for example late fees); and

iv. The imposition of any charges (for example, private mortgage insurance).

2. Description of late fees. The description of any late fee charges includes the date of the late fee, the amount of the late fee, and the fact that a late fee was imposed.

3. Partial payments. If a partial payment is sent to a suspense or unapplied funds account, this fact must be in the transaction description along with the date and amount of the payment.

41(e)(3) Coupon book exemption.

1. Fixed rate. For guidance on the meaning of 'fixed rate' for purpose of § 1026.41(e)(3), see § 1026.18(s)(7)(iii) and its commentary.

2. Coupon book. A coupon book is a booklet provided to the consumer with a page for each billing cycle during a set period of time (often covering one year). These pages are designed to be torn off and returned to the servicer with a payment for each billing cycle. Additional information about the loan is often included on or inside the front or back cover, or on filler pages in the coupon book.

3. Information location. The information required by paragraph (e)(3)(ii) need not be provided on each coupon, but should be provided somewhere in the coupon book. Such information could be located, e.g., on or inside the front or back cover, or on filler pages in the coupon book.

4. Outstanding principal balance. Paragraph (e)(3)(ii)(A) requires the information listed in paragraph (d)(7) to be included in the coupon book. Paragraph (d)(7)(i) requires the disclosure of the outstanding principal balance. If the servicer makes use of a coupon book and the exemption in § 1026.41(e)(3), the servicer need only disclose the principal balance at the beginning of the time period covered by the coupon book.

41(e)(4) Small servicers.

41(e)(4)(ii) Small servicer defined.

1. Mortgage loans considered. Pursuant to § 1026.41(a)(1), the mortgage loans considered in determining status as a small servicer are closed-end consumer credit transactions secured by a dwelling, subject to the exclusions in § 1026.41(e)(4)(iii).

2. Services, together with affiliates, 5,000 or fewer mortgage loans. To qualify as a small servicer, under § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(A), a servicer must service, together with any affiliates, 5,000 or fewer mortgage loans, for all of which the servicer (or an affiliate) is the creditor or assignee. There are two elements to satisfying § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(A). First, a servicer, together with any affiliates, must service 5,000 or fewer mortgage loans. Second, a servicer must service only mortgage loans for which the servicer (or an affiliate) is the creditor or assignee. To be the creditor or assignee of a mortgage loan, the servicer (or an affiliate) must either currently own the mortgage loan or must have been the entity to which the mortgage loan obligation was initially payable (that is, the originator of the mortgage loan). A servicer is not a small servicer under § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(A) if it services any mortgage loans for which the servicer or an affiliate is not the creditor or assignee (that is, for which the servicer or an affiliate is not the owner or was not the originator). The following two examples demonstrate circumstances in which a servicer would not qualify as a small servicer under § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(A) because it did not meet both requirements under § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(A) for determining a servicer's status as a small servicer:

i. A servicer services 3,000 mortgage loans, all of which it or an affiliate owns or originated. An affiliate of the servicer services 4,000 other mortgage loans, all of which it or an affiliate owns or originated. Because the number of mortgage loans serviced by a servicer is determined by counting the mortgage loans serviced by a servicer together with any affiliates, both of these servicers are considered to be servicing 7,000 mortgage loans and neither servicer is a small servicer.

ii. A service services 3,100 mortgage loans—3,000 mortgage loans it owns or originated and 100 mortgage loans it neither owns nor originated, but for which it owns the mortgage servicing rights. The servicer is not a small servicer because it services mortgage loans for which the servicer (or an affiliate) is not the creditor or assignee, notwithstanding that the servicer services fewer than 5,000 mortgage loans.

3. Master servicing and subservicing. A servicer that qualifies as a small servicer does not lose its small servicer status if it retains a subservicer, as that term is defined in 12 CFR 1024.31, to service any of its mortgage loans. A subservicer can gain the benefit of the small servicer exemption only if (1) the master servicer, as that term is defined in 12 CFR 1024.31, is a small servicer and (2) the subservicer is a small servicer. A subservicer generally will not qualify as a small servicer because it does not own or did not originate the mortgage loans it subservices — unless it is an affiliate of a master servicer that qualifies as a small servicer. The following examples demonstrate the application of the small servicer exemption for different forms of servicing relationships:

i. A credit union services 4,000 mortgage loans, all of which it originated or owns. The credit union retains a credit union service organization, that is not an affiliate, to subservice 1,000 of the mortgage loans. The credit union is a small servicer and, thus, can gain the benefit of the small servicer exemption for the 3,000 mortgage loans the credit union services itself. The credit union service organization is not a small servicer because it services mortgage loans it does not own or did not originate. Accordingly, the credit union service organization does not gain the benefit of the small servicer exemption and, thus, must comply with any applicable mortgage servicing requirements for the 1,000 mortgage loans it subservices.

ii. A bank holding company, through a lender subsidiary, owns or originated 4,000 mortgage loans. All mortgage servicing rights for the 4,000 mortgage loans are owned by a wholly owned master servicer subsidiary. Servicing for the 4,000 mortgage loans is conducted by a wholly owned subservicer subsidiary. The bank holding company controls all of these subsidiaries and, thus, they are affiliates of the bank holding company pursuant 12 CFR 1026.32(b)(2). Because the master servicer and subservicer service 5,000 or fewer mortgage loans, and because all the mortgage loans are owned or originated by an affiliate, the master servicer and the subservicer both qualify for the small servicer exemption for all 4,000 mortgage loans.

iii. A nonbank servicer services 4,000 mortgage loans, all of which it originated or owns. The servicer retains a "component servicer" to assist it with servicing functions. The component servicer is not engaged in "servicing" as defined in 12 CFR 1024.2; that is, the component servicer does not receive any scheduled periodic payments from a borrower pursuant to the terms of any mortgage loan, including amounts for escrow accounts, and does not make the payments to the owner of the loan or other third parties of principal and interest and such other payments with respect to the amounts received from the borrower as may be required pursuant to the terms of the mortgage servicing loan documents or servicing contract. The component servicer is not a subservicer pursuant to 12 CFR 1024.31 because it is not engaged in servicing, as that term is defined in 12 CFR 1024.2. The nonbank servicer is a small servicer and, thus, can gain the benefit of the small servicer exemption with regard to all 4,000 mortgage loans it services.

4. Nonprofit entity that services 5,000 or fewer mortgage loans. To qualify as a small servicer under § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(C), a servicer must be a nonprofit entity that services 5,000 or fewer mortgage loans, including any mortgage loans serviced on behalf of associated nonprofit entities, for all of which the servicer or an associated nonprofit entity is the creditor. There are two elements to satisfying § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(C). First, a nonprofit entity must service 5,000 or fewer mortgage loans, including any mortgage loans serviced on behalf of associated nonprofit entities. For each associated nonprofit entity, the small servicer determination is made separately, without consideration of the number of loans serviced by another associated nonprofit entity. Second, a nonprofit entity must service only mortgage loans for which the servicer (or an associated nonprofit entity) is the creditor. To be the creditor, the servicer (or an associated nonprofit entity) must have been the entity to which the mortgage loan obligation was initially payable (that is, the originator of the mortgage loan). A nonprofit entity is not a small servicer under § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(C) if it services any mortgage loans for which the servicer (or an associated nonprofit entity) is not the creditor (that is, for which the servicer or an associated nonprofit entity was not the originator). The first of the following two examples demonstrates circumstances in which a nonprofit entity would qualify as a small servicer under § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(C) because it meets both requirements for determining a nonprofit entity's status as a small servicer under § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(C). The second example demonstrates circumstances in which a nonprofit entity would not qualify as a small servicer under § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(C) because it does not meet both requirements under § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(C).

i. Nonprofit entity A services 3,000 of its own mortgage loans, and 1,500 mortgage loans on behalf of associated nonprofit entity B. All 4,500 mortgage loans were originated by A or B. Associated nonprofit entity C services 2,500 mortgage loans, all of which it originated. Because the number of mortgage loans serviced by a nonprofit entity is determined by counting the number of mortgage loans serviced by the nonprofit entity (including mortgage loans serviced on behalf of associated nonprofit entities) but not counting any mortgage loans serviced by an associated nonprofit entity, A and C are both small servicers.

ii. A nonprofit entity services 4,500 mortgage loans—3,000 mortgage loans it originated, 1,000 mortgage loans originated by associated nonprofit entities, and 500 mortgage loans neither it nor an associated nonprofit entity originated. The nonprofit entity is not a small servicer because it services mortgage loans for which neither it nor an associated nonprofit entity is the creditor, notwithstanding that it services fewer than 5,000 mortgage loans.

41(e)(4)(iii) Small servicer determination.

1. Loans obtained by merger or acquisition. Any mortgage loans obtained by a servicer or an affiliate as part of a merger or acquisition, or as part of the acquisition of all of the assets or liabilities of a branch office of a lender, should be considered mortgage loans for which the servicer or an affiliate is the creditor to which the mortgage loan is initially payable. A branch office means either an office of a depository institution that is approved as a branch by a Federal or State supervisory agency or an office of a for-profit mortgage lending institution (other than a depository institution) that takes applications from the public for mortgage loans.

2. Timing for small servicer exemption. The following examples demonstrate when a servicer either is considered or is no longer considered a small servicer under § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(A) and (C):

i. Assume a servicer (that as of January 1 of the current year qualifies as a small servicer) begins servicing more than 5,000 mortgage loans on October 1, and services more than 5,000 mortgage loans as of January 1 of the following year. The servicer would no longer be considered a small servicer on January 1 of the following year and would have to comply with any requirements from which it is no longer exempt as a small servicer on April 1 of the following year.

Assume a servicer (that as of January 1 of the current year qualifies as a small servicer) begins servicing more than 5,000 mortgage loans on February 1, and services more than 5,000 mortgage loans as of January 1 of the following year. The servicer would no longer be considered a small servicer on January 1 of the following year and would have to comply with any requirements from which it is no longer exempt as a small servicer on that same January 1.

iii. Assume a servicer (that as of January 1 of the current year qualifies as a small servicer) begins servicing more than 5,000 mortgage loans on February 1, but services fewer than 5,000 mortgage loans as of January 1 of the following year. The servicer is considered a small servicer for the following year.

3. Mortgage loans not considered in determining whether a servicer is a small servicer. Mortgage loans that are not considered pursuant to § 1026.41(e)(4)(iii) in applying § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(A) are not considered either for determining whether a servicer (together with any affiliates) services 5,000 or fewer mortgage loans or whether a servicer is servicing only mortgage loans that it (or an affiliate) owns or originated. For example, assume a servicer services 5,400 mortgage loans. Of these mortgage loans, the servicer owns or originated 4,800 mortgage loans, voluntarily services 300 mortgage loans that neither it (nor an affiliate) owns or originated and for which the servicer does not receive any compensation or fees, and services 300 reverse mortgage transactions. The voluntarily serviced mortgage loans and reverse mortgage loans are not considered in determining whether the servicer qualifies as a small servicer pursuant to § 1026.41(e)(4)(iii)(A). Thus, because only the 4,800 mortgage loans owned or originated by the servicer are considered in determining whether the servicer qualifies as a small servicer, the servicer satisfies § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(A) with regard to all 5,400 mortgage loans it services.

4. Mortgage loans not considered in determining whether a nonprofit entity is a small servicer. Mortgage loans that are not considered pursuant to § 1026.41(e)(4)(iii) in applying § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(C) are not considered either for determining whether a nonprofit entity services 5,000 or fewer mortgage loans, including any mortgage loans serviced on behalf of associated nonprofit entities, or whether a nonprofit entity is servicing only mortgage loans that it or an associated nonprofit entity originated. For example, assume a servicer that is a nonprofit entity services 5,400 mortgage loans. Of these mortgage loans, the nonprofit entity originated 2,800 mortgage loans and associated nonprofit entities originated 2,000 mortgage loans. The nonprofit entity receives compensation for servicing the loans originated by associated nonprofits. The nonprofit entity also voluntarily services 600 mortgage loans that were originated by an entity that is not an associated nonprofit entity, and receives no compensation or fees for servicing these loans. The voluntarily serviced mortgage loans are not considered in determining whether the servicer qualifies as a small servicer. Thus, because only the 4,800 mortgage loans originated by the nonprofit entity or associated nonprofit entities are considered in determining whether the servicer qualifies as a small servicer, the servicer satisfies § 1026.41(e)(4)(ii)(C) with regard to all 5,400 mortgage loans it services.

5. Limited role of voluntarily serviced mortgage loans. Reverse mortgages and mortgage loans secured by consumers' interests in timeshare plans, in addition to not being considered in determining small servicer qualification, are also exempt from the requirements of § 1026.41. In contrast, although voluntarily serviced mortgage loans, as defined by § 1026.41(e)(4)(iii)(A), are likewise not considered in determining small servicer status, they are not exempt from the requirements of § 1026.41. Thus, a servicer that does not qualify as a small servicer would not have to provide periodic statements for reverse mortgages and timeshare plans because they are exempt from the rule, but would have to provide periodic statements for mortgage loans it voluntarily services.

41(e)(5) Consumers in Bankruptcy.

1. Commencing a case. The requirements of § 1026.41 do not apply once a petition is filed under Title 11 of the United States Code, commencing a case in which the consumer is a debtor.

2. Obligation to resume sending periodic statements. With respect to any portion of the mortgage debt that is not discharged, a servicer must resume sending periodic statements in compliance with § 1026.41 within a reasonably prompt time after the next payment due date that follows the earliest of any of three potential outcomes in the consumer's bankruptcy case: (i) the case is dismissed, (ii) the case is closed, or (iii) the consumer receives a discharge under 11 U.S.C. §§ 727, 1141, 1228, or 1328. However, this requirement to resume sending periodic statements does not require a servicer to communicate with a consumer in a manner that would be inconsistent with applicable bankruptcy law or a court order in a bankruptcy case. To the extent permitted by such law or court order, a servicer may adapt the requirements of § 1026.41 in any manner believed necessary.

The periodic statement is not required for any portion of the mortgage debt that is discharged under applicable provisions of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. If the consumer's bankruptcy case is revived—for example if the court reinstates a previously dismissed case, reopens the case, or revokes a discharge—the servicer is again exempt from the requirement in § 1026.41.

3. Joint obligors. When two or more consumers are joint obligors with primary liability on a closed-end consumer credit transaction secured by a dwelling subject to § 1026.41, the exemption in § 1026.41(e)(5) applies if any of the consumers is in bankruptcy. For example, if a husband and wife jointly own a home, and the husband files for bankruptcy, the servicer is exempt from providing periodic statements to both the husband and the wife.

 

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