Skip to content

Super Security Professional!

WHAT THE SECURITY OFFICER OF THE '90s IS EXPECTED TO KNOW
There is a task force working with the American Bankers Association attempting to formulate a certification program for financial institution security officers. We were impressed by the list of knowledge thought to be required in order to consider a security officer qualified. The following is quoted directly from Peter Baldassaro of Hibernia National Bank in New Orleans, a member of the task force, during a presentation on the Certification Program at the ABA Security and Risk Management Conference in Anaheim on January 26, 1990.

"In the process of evaluating the certification needs, we identified a number of things that the security professional should be versed in.

"First, he has to have a written security program that's approved by the Board.

"We feel that he should be able to identify the responsibilities of the security function, the operating standards, the adequate procedures for robberies and dealing with robbery situations.

"He should be able to address fraud, the regulatory requirements, and the actual investigative function.

"He should be knowledgeable on security devices, on emergency situations, electronic funds transfers, currency transaction reports, criminal referral forms, life safety training, and consumer questions.

"As to the security devices, he should be expert in alarms for robbery, burglary access control, duress, CCTV, vaults, bandit barriers, and communication equipment-specifically radios and cellular telephones.

"He should have a knowledge of the various robbery response devices such as electronic trackers and dye packs. And he should know the technical standards of the equipment and the devices that he plans to employ.

"He should be very, very thorough on his knowledge of criminal events to deal with internal fraud, embezzlements, drug activity, falsification of records and insurance fraud.

"He should be able to deal with external fraud on checks, credit cards, wire transfers, new accounts, ATM robberies, burglaries and larcenies.

"He should be up to date on the legislature and laws concerning polygraph, drug analysis, bio analysis (that's fingerprints, hair, urine and such).

"He should be able to conduct a background screening for new applicants or loan customers discreetly and thoroughly.

"And he should be able to develop disaster plans for life safety and for business resumption, dealing with evacuation, training of employees, and the testing of all applicable systems.

"He also has some legal responsibilities with the regulatory functions and he's got administrative responsibilities dealing with budgets, planning risk assessment and other topics."

Pretty tall order for our SUPER SECURITY PROFESSIONALS! Fortunately, most of the security officers we know fit the bill!

Copyright © 1990 Bankers' Hotline. Originally appeared in Bankers' Hotline, Vol. 1, No. 2, 2/90

First published on 02/01/1990

Filed under: 

Banker Store View All

From training, policies, forms, and publications, to office products and occasional gifts, it’s available here:

Banker Store

hot right now

image description

Looking for effective, convenient training on a particular subject?

BOL Learning Connect offers more than 200 courses ON-DEMAND or on CD ROM from AML to Reg Z and every topic in between.

Search Topics