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1026.8—Identifying transactions on periodic statements.*

This page includes pending amendments to this section of the regulation. Amendments effective April 1, 2019, are shown in dark green text.


  • Introductory text
  • (a) Sale credit
  • (b) Nonsale credit
  • (c) Alternative creditor procedures; consumer inquiries for clarification or documentation
  • The creditor shall identify credit transactions on or with the first periodic statement that reflects the transaction by furnishing the following information, as applicable:

    (a) Sale credit. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, for each credit transaction involving the sale of property or services, the creditor must disclose the amount and date of the transaction, and either:

    (i) A brief identification of the property or services purchased, for creditors and sellers that are the same or related; or

    (ii) The seller's name; and the city and state or foreign country where the transaction took place. The creditor may omit the address or provide any suitable designation that helps the consumer to identify the transaction when the transaction took place at a location that is not fixed; took place in the consumer's home; or was a mail, Internet, or telephone order.

    (2) Creditors need not comply with paragraph (a)(1) of this section if an actual copy of the receipt or other credit document is provided with the first periodic statement reflecting the transaction, and the amount of the transaction and either the date of the transaction to the consumer's account or the date of debiting the transaction are disclosed on the copy or on the periodic statement.

    Official Interpretation

    8(a) Sale Credit

    1. Sale credit. The term “sale credit” refers to a purchase in which the consumer uses a credit card or otherwise directly accesses an open-end line of credit (see comment 8(b)–1 if access is by means of a check) to obtain goods or services from a merchant, whether or not the merchant is the card issuer or creditor. “Sale credit” includes:

    Editor's Note: Effective April 1, 2019, the introductory portion of para. 1. is amended, to read:

    1. Sale credit. The term “sale credit” refers to a purchase in which the consumer uses a credit card or otherwise directly accesses an open-end line of credit (see comment 8(b)-1 if access is by means of a check) to obtain goods or services from a merchant, whether or not the merchant is the card issuer or creditor. See comment 8(a)-9 for guidance on when credit accessed by a hybrid prepaid-credit card from a covered separate credit feature is “sale credit” or “nonsale credit.” “Sale credit” includes:

    i. The purchase of funds-transfer services (such as a wire transfer) from an intermediary.

    ii. The purchase of services from the card issuer or creditor. For the purchase of services that are costs imposed as part of the plan under §1026.6(b)(3), card issuers and creditors comply with the requirements for identifying transactions under this section by disclosing the fees in accordance with the requirements of §1026.7(b)(6). For the purchases of services that are not costs imposed as part of the plan, card issuers and creditors may, at their option, identify transactions under this section or in accordance with the requirements of §1026.7(b)(6).

    2. Amount—transactions not billed in full. If sale transactions are not billed in full on any single statement, but are billed periodically in precomputed installments, the first periodic statement reflecting the transaction must show either the full amount of the transaction together with the date the transaction actually took place; or the amount of the first installment that was debited to the account together with the date of the transaction or the date on which the first installment was debited to the account. In any event, subsequent periodic statements should reflect each installment due, together with either any other identifying information required by §1026.8(a) (such as the seller's name and address in a three-party situation) or other appropriate identifying information relating the transaction to the first billing. The debiting date for the particular installment, or the date the transaction took place, may be used as the date of the transaction on these subsequent statements.

    3. Date—when a transaction takes place. i. If the consumer conducts the transaction in person, the date of the transaction is the calendar date on which the consumer made the purchase or order, or secured the advance.

    ii. For transactions billed to the account on an ongoing basis (other than installments to pay a precomputed amount), the date of the transaction is the date on which the amount is debited to the account. This might include, for example, monthly insurance premiums.

    iii. For mail, Internet, or telephone orders, a creditor may disclose as the transaction date either the invoice date, the debiting date, or the date the order was placed by telephone or via the Internet.

    iv. In a foreign transaction, the debiting date may be considered the transaction date.

    4. Date—sufficiency of description. i. If the creditor discloses only the date of the transaction, the creditor need not identify it as the “transaction date.” If the creditor discloses more than one date (for example, the transaction date and the posting date), the creditor must identify each.

    ii. The month and day sufficiently identify the transaction date, unless the posting of the transaction is delayed so long that the year is needed for a clear disclosure to the consumer.

    5. Same or related persons. i. For purposes of identifying transactions, the term same or related persons refers to, for example:

    A. Franchised or licensed sellers of a creditor's product or service.

    B. Sellers who assign or sell open-end sales accounts to a creditor or arrange for such credit under a plan that allows the consumer to use the credit only in transactions with that seller.

    ii. A seller is not related to the creditor merely because the seller and the creditor have an agreement authorizing the seller to honor the creditor's credit card.

    6. Brief identification—sufficiency of description. The “brief identification” provision in §1026.8(a)(1)(i) requires a designation that will enable the consumer to reconcile the periodic statement with the consumer's own records. In determining the sufficiency of the description, the following rules apply:

    i. While item-by-item descriptions are not necessary, reasonable precision is required. For example, “merchandise,” “miscellaneous,” “second-hand goods,” or “promotional items” would not suffice.

    ii. A reference to a department in a sales establishment that accurately conveys the identification of the types of property or services available in the department is sufficient—for example, “jewelry,” or “sporting goods.”

    iii. A number or symbol that is related to an identification list printed elsewhere on the statement that reasonably identifies the transaction with the creditor is sufficient.

    7. Seller's name—sufficiency of description. The requirement contemplates that the seller's name will appear on the periodic statement in essentially the same form as it appears on transaction documents provided to the consumer at the time of the sale. The seller's name may also be disclosed as, for example:

    i. A more complete spelling of the name that was alphabetically abbreviated on the receipt or other credit document.

    ii. An alphabetical abbreviation of the name on the periodic statement even if the name appears in a more complete spelling on the receipt or other credit document. Terms that merely indicate the form of a business entity, such as “Inc.,” “Co.,” or “Ltd.,” may always be omitted.

    8. Location of transaction. i. If the seller has multiple stores or branches within a city, the creditor need not identify the specific branch at which the sale occurred.

    ii. When no meaningful address is available because the consumer did not make the purchase at any fixed location of the seller, the creditor may omit the address, or may provide some other identifying designation, such as “aboard plane,” “ABC Airways Flight,” “customer's home,” “telephone order,” “internet order” or “mail order.”

    Editor's Note: Effective April 1, 2019, para. 9. is added, to read:

    9. Covered separate credit feature accessible by hybrid prepaid-credit card. i. A transaction will be treated as a “sale credit” under § 1026.8(a) in cases where a consumer uses a hybrid prepaid-credit card as defined in § 1026.61 to make a purchase to obtain goods or services from a merchant with credit from a covered separate credit feature and the credit is drawn directly from the covered separate credit feature without transferring funds into the asset feature of the prepaid account to cover the amount of the purchase. For example, assume that the consumer has $10 of funds in the asset feature of the prepaid account and initiates a transaction with a merchant to obtain goods or services with the hybrid prepaid-credit card for $25. In this case, $10 is debited from the asset feature, and $15 of credit is drawn directly from the covered separate credit feature accessed by the hybrid prepaid-credit card without any transfer of funds into the asset feature of the prepaid account to cover the amount of the purchase. The $15 credit transaction will be treated as “sale credit” under § 1026.8(a).

    ii. On the other hand, a transaction will be treated as “nonsale credit” for purposes of § 1026.8(b) in cases where a consumer uses a hybrid prepaid-credit card as defined in § 1026.61 to make a purchase to obtain goods or services from a merchant and credit is transferred from a covered separate credit feature accessed by the hybrid prepaid-credit card into the asset feature of the prepaid account to cover the amount of the purchase. For example, assume the same facts as above, except that the $15 will be transferred from the credit feature to the asset feature, and a transaction of $25 is debited from the asset feature of the prepaid account. In this case, the $15 credit transaction is treated as “nonsale credit” under § 1026.8(b). See comment 8(b)-1.vi below.

    iii. If a transaction is “sale credit” as described above in comment 8(a)-9.i, the following applies:

    A. If a hybrid prepaid-credit card is used to obtain goods or services from a merchant and the transaction is partially paid with funds in the asset feature of the prepaid account, and partially paid with credit from a covered separate credit feature, the amount to be disclosed under § 1026.8(a) is the amount of the credit extension, not the total amount of the purchase transaction.

    B. For a transaction at point of sale where credit from a covered separate credit feature is accessed by a hybrid prepaid-credit card, and that transaction partially involves the purchase of goods or services and partially involves other credit such as cash back given to the cardholder, the creditor must disclose the entire amount of the credit transaction as sale credit, including the part of the transaction that does not relate to the purchase of goods or services.

     

    (b) Nonsale credit. For each credit transaction not involving the sale of property or services, the creditor must disclose a brief identification of the transaction; the amount of the transaction; and at least one of the following dates: The date of the transaction, the date the transaction was debited to the consumer's account, or, if the consumer signed the credit document, the date appearing on the document. If an actual copy of the receipt or other credit document is provided and that copy shows the amount and at least one of the specified dates, the brief identification may be omitted.

    Official Interpretation

    8(b) Nonsale credit.

    1. Nonsale credit. The term “nonsale credit” refers to any form of loan credit including, for example:

    i. A cash advance.

    ii. An advance on a credit plan that is accessed by overdrafts on a checking account.

    Editor's Note: Effective April 1, 2019, para. 8(b)-1.ii is amended, to read:

    ii. An advance on a credit plan that is accessed by overdrafts on an asset account other than a prepaid account as defined in § 1026.61.

    iii. The use of a “supplemental credit device” in the form of a check or draft or the use of the overdraft credit plan accessed by a debit card, even if such use is in connection with a purchase of goods or services.

    iv. Miscellaneous debits to remedy mispostings, returned checks, and similar entries.

    Editor's Note: Effective April 1, 2019, para. 8(b)-1.v. and vi. are added, to read:

    v. An advance at an ATM on a covered separate credit feature accessed by a hybrid prepaid-credit card as defined in § 1026.61. If a hybrid prepaid-credit card is used to obtain an advance at an ATM and the transaction is partially paid with funds from the asset feature of the prepaid account, and partially paid with a credit extension from the covered separate credit feature, the amount to be disclosed under § 1026.8(b) is the amount of the credit extension, not the total amount of the ATM transaction.

    vi. A transaction where a consumer uses a hybrid prepaid-credit card as defined in § 1026.61 to make a purchase to obtain goods or services from a merchant and credit is transferred from a covered separate credit feature accessed by the hybrid prepaid-credit card into the asset feature of the prepaid account to cover the amount of the purchase, as described in comment 8(a)-9.ii. In this scenario, the amount to be disclosed under § 1026.8(b) is the amount of the credit extension, not the total amount of the purchase transaction.

    2. Amount—overdraft credit plans. If credit is extended under an overdraft credit plan tied to a checking account or by means of a debit card tied to an overdraft credit plan:

    Editor's Note: Effective April 1, 2019, the introductory text of para. 8(b)-2.is amended, to read:

    2. Amount—overdraft credit plans. If credit is extended under an overdraft credit plan tied to an asset account other than a prepaid account as defined in § 1026.61 or by means of a debit card tied to an overdraft credit plan:

    i. The amount to be disclosed is that of the credit extension, not the face amount of the check or the total amount of the debit/credit transaction.

    ii. The creditor may disclose the amount of the credit extensions on a cumulative daily basis, rather than the amount attributable to each check or each use of the debit card that accesses the credit plan.

    3. Date of transaction. See comment 8(a)–4.

    4. Nonsale transaction—sufficiency of identification. The creditor sufficiently identifies a nonsale transaction by describing the type of advance it represents, such as cash advance, loan, overdraft loan, or any readily understandable trade name for the credit program.

     

    (c) Alternative creditor procedures; consumer inquiries for clarification or documentation. The following procedures apply to creditors that treat an inquiry for clarification or documentation as a notice of a billing error, including correcting the account in accordance with §1026.13(e):

    (1) Failure to disclose the information required by paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section is not a failure to comply with the regulation, provided that the creditor also maintains procedures reasonably designed to obtain and provide the information. This applies to transactions that take place outside a state, as defined in §1026.2(a)(26), whether or not the creditor maintains procedures reasonably adapted to obtain the required information.

    (2) As an alternative to the brief identification for sale or nonsale credit, the creditor may disclose a number or symbol that also appears on the receipt or other credit document given to the consumer, if the number or symbol reasonably identifies that transaction with that creditor.

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