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1026.30—Limitation on rates.

A creditor shall include in any consumer credit contract secured by a dwelling and subject to the Act and this part the maximum interest rate that may be imposed during the term of the obligation when:

(a) In the case of closed-end credit, the annual percentage rate may increase after consummation, or

(b) In the case of open-end credit, the annual percentage rate may increase during the plan.

Section 1026.30—Limitation on Rates

1. Scope of coverage. i. The requirement of this section applies to consumer credit obligations secured by a dwelling (as dwelling is defined in §1026.2(a)(19)) in which the annual percentage rate may increase after consummation (or during the term of the plan, in the case of open-end credit) as a result of an increase in the interest rate component of the finance charge—whether those increases are tied to an index or formula or are within a creditor's discretion. The section applies to credit sales as well as loans. Examples of credit obligations subject to this section include:

A. Dwelling-secured credit obligations that require variable-rate disclosures under the regulation because the interest rate may increase during the term of the obligation.

B. Dwelling-secured open-end credit plans entered into before November 7, 1989 (the effective date of the home equity rules) that are not considered variable-rate obligations for purposes of disclosure under the regulation but where the creditor reserves the contractual right to increase the interest rate—periodic rate and corresponding annual percentage rate—during the term of the plan.

ii. In contrast, credit obligations in which there is no contractual right to increase the interest rate during the term of the obligation are not subject to this section. Examples include:

A. “Shared-equity” or “shared-appreciation” mortgage loans that have a fixed rate of interest and a shared-appreciation feature based on the consumer's equity in the mortgaged property. (The appreciation share is payable in a lump sum at a specified time.)

B. Dwelling-secured fixed-rate closed-end balloon-payment mortgage loans and dwelling-secured fixed-rate open-end plans with a stated term that the creditor may renew at maturity. (Contrast with the renewable balloon-payment mortgage instrument described in comment 17(c)(1)–11.)

C. Dwelling-secured fixed-rate closed-end multiple advance transactions in which each advance is disclosed as a separate transaction.

D. “Price level adjusted mortgages” or other indexed mortgages that have a fixed rate of interest but provide for periodic adjustments to payments and the loan balance to reflect changes in an index measuring prices or inflation.

iii. The requirement of this section does not apply to credit obligations entered into prior to December 9, 1987. Consequently, new advances under open-end credit plans existing prior to December 9, 1987, are not subject to this section.

2. Refinanced obligations. On or after December 9, 1987, when a credit obligation is refinanced, as defined in §1026.20(a), the new obligation is subject to this section if it is dwelling-secured and allows for increases in the interest rate.

3. Assumptions. On or after December 9, 1987, when a credit obligation is assumed, as defined in §1026.20(b), the obligation becomes subject to this section if it is dwelling-secured and allows for increases in the interest rate.

4. Modifications of obligations. The modification of an obligation, regardless of when the obligation was entered into, is generally not covered by this section. For example, increasing the credit limit on a dwelling-secured, open-end plan with a variable interest rate entered into before the effective date of the rule does not make the obligation subject to this section. If, however, a security interest in a dwelling is added on or after December 9, 1987, to a credit obligation that allows for interest rate increases, the obligation becomes subject to this section. Similarly, if a variable interest rate feature is added to a dwelling-secured credit obligation, the obligation becomes subject to this section.

5. Land trusts. In some states, a land trust is used in residential real estate transactions. (See discussion in comment 3(a)–8.) If a consumer-purpose loan that allows for interest rate increases is secured by an assignment of a beneficial interest in a land trust that holds title to a consumer's dwelling, that loan is subject to this section.

6. Relationship to other sections. Unless otherwise provided for in the commentary to this section, other provisions of the regulation such as definitions, exemptions, rules and interpretations also apply to this section where appropriate. To illustrate:

i. An adjustable interest rate business-purpose loan is not subject to this section even if the loan is secured by a dwelling because such credit extensions are not subject to the regulation. (See generally §1026.3(a).)

ii. Creditors subject to this section are only those that fall within the definition of a creditor in §1026.2(a)(17).

7. Consumer credit contract. Creditors are required to specify a lifetime maximum interest rate in their credit contracts—the instrument that creates personal liability and generally contains the terms and conditions of the agreement (for example, a promissory note or home-equity line of credit agreement). In some states, the signing of a commitment letter may create a binding obligation, for example, constituting consummation as defined in §1026.2(a)(13). The maximum interest rate must be included in the credit contract, but a creditor may include the rate ceiling in the commitment instrument as well.

8. Manner of stating the maximum interest rate. The maximum interest rate must be stated in the credit contract either as a specific amount or in any other manner that would allow the consumer to easily ascertain, at the time of entering into the obligation, what the rate ceiling will be over the term of the obligation.

i. For example, the following statements would be sufficiently specific:

A. The maximum interest rate will not exceed X%.

B. The interest rate will never be higher than X percentage points above the initial rate of Y%.

C. The interest rate will not exceed X%, or X percentage points above [a rate to be determined at some future point in time], whichever is less.

D. The maximum interest rate will not exceed X%, or the state usury ceiling, whichever is less.

ii. The following statements would not comply with this section:

A. The interest rate will never be higher than X percentage points over the prevailing market rate.

B. The interest rate will never be higher than X percentage points above [a rate to be determined at some future point in time].

C. The interest rate will not exceed the state usury ceiling which is currently X%.

iii. A creditor may state the maximum rate in terms of a maximum annual percentage rate that may be imposed. Under an open-end credit plan, this normally would be the corresponding annual percentage rate. ( See generally §1026.6(a)(1)(ii) and (b)(4)(i)(A).)

9. Multiple interest rate ceilings. Creditors are not prohibited from setting multiple interest rate ceilings. For example, on loans with multiple variable-rate features, creditors may establish a maximum interest rate for each feature. To illustrate, in a variable-rate loan that has an option to convert to a fixed rate, a creditor may set one maximum interest rate for the initially imposed index-based variable-rate feature and another for the conversion option. Of course, a creditor may establish one maximum interest rate applicable to all features.

10. Interest rate charged after default. State law may allow an interest rate after default higher than the contract rate in effect at the time of default; however, the interest rate after default is subject to a maximum interest rate set forth in a credit obligation that is otherwise subject to this section. This rule applies only in situations in which a post-default agreement is still considered part of the original obligation.

11. Increasing the maximum interest rate—general rule. Generally, a creditor may not increase the maximum interest rate originally set on a credit obligation subject to this section unless the consumer and the creditor enter into a new obligation. Therefore, under an open-end plan, a creditor may not increase the rate ceiling imposed merely because there is an increase in the credit limit. If an open-end plan is closed and another opened, a new rate ceiling may be imposed. Furthermore, where an open-end plan has a fixed maturity and a creditor renews the plan at maturity, or enters into a closed-end credit transaction, a new maximum interest rate may be set at that time. If the open-end plan provides for a repayment phase, the maximum interest rate cannot be increased when the repayment phase begins unless the agreement provided for such an increase. For a closed-end credit transaction, a new maximum interest rate may be set only if the transaction is satisfied and replaced by a new obligation. (The exceptions in §1026.20(a)(1)–(5) which limit what transactions are considered refinancings for purposes of disclosure do not apply with respect to increasing a rate ceiling that has been imposed; if a transaction is satisfied and replaced, the rate ceiling may be increased.)

12. Increasing the maximum interest rate—assumption of an obligation. If an obligation subject to this section is assumed by a new obligor and the original obligor is released from liability, the maximum interest rate set on the obligation may be increased as part of the assumption agreement. (This rule applies whether or not the transaction constitutes an assumption as defined in §1026.20(b).)

 

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